Remembrance Service at Lyttelton

REMEMBRANCE SERVICE AT SAINTS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, LYTTELTON

During October 2015 the Saints Presbyterian Church approached the National Headquarters of the South African Legion of Military Veterans for assistance in planning their 2015 Remembrance Day Service. It was referred to the Public Relations portfolio and I contacted the church and got involved. One of the request was the provision of 200 Poppies, which the Pretoria branch obliged. Saints Presbyterian Church made a donation to the Legion.
Today, Sunday 08 November, Lgr Charles Ross and his wife Rina attended the Remembrance Day Service in the Saints Presbyterian Church in Lyttelton. Every member of the congregation attending the moving service conducted by Reverend Zolani Makalima received a Poppy on arrival.

Following the normal service the Remembrance Day part of the service commenced with the background to Remembrance Day. During this mentioned was made of the South African Legion of Military Veterans, who provided the Poppies, and the very important work currently being done by the Legion. This was followed with the reading of the poem “In Flanders Fields” and a address by Lgr Charles Ross on the importance of Remembrance Day post the Second World War.

The congregation was then called to Remembrance followed by the sounding (playing) of the Last Post on an electric guitar (this was a first for me, and obviously for many of the congregation), 2 minutes silence and the Reveille (a recording). The congregation was called upon to place flowers on a rugged cross covered with mesh wire, symbolizing the barbed wire of the First World War. This was a very interesting way of remembrance. Lgr Ross placed a flower on behalf of the South African Legion of Military Veterans.

The service concluded with the church choir singing the hymn “Plea for Africa”.

Story for the South African Legion of Military Veterans by Lgr Charles Ross with photos by Rina Ross.

Cullinan Military Cemetery

CULLINAN MILITARY CEMETERY – CULLINAN

During World War 2 the Zonderwater area near Cullinan became a major assemble and training area for the troops of the Union Defence Force preparing for participation in the war “up North”.
The village of Cullinan serves the Premier Diamond mine. During the Second World War the Union Defence Force occupied virtually the whole village as the command structure for the adjoining Zonderwater troop concentration and training complex.

This is still evident on the hills surrounding Cullinan where some of the Regiments packed their Regimental badges in stones.

Midway through the war the largest prisoner of war camp for Italians captured in East and North Africa was established at Zonderwater and this is the site of a large Italian war cemetery, now situated within the Zonderwater prison grounds. The Italian Prisoner of War cemetery is maintained in immaculate condition and an annual memorial service is held on the first Sunday of November. The cemetery also houses a small museum where article made by the prisoners of war are exhibited.

The Cullinan Military Cemetery is on the outskirts of the town and 102 Commonwealth war casualties are buried in the cemetery. The cemetery is the responsibility of the South African Agency of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The casualties buried in the cemetery comprises 54 members of the South African Native Military Corps, 18 members of the African Pioneer Corps (HCT) mainly from Basutoland (Lesotho) and Bechuanaland (Botswana), 15 members of the Cape Corps, 14 members of the South African Indian and Malay Corps and 1 member from the Essential Services Protection Corps.

A single Commonwealth war casualty is buried in the Cullinan (Premier Mine) Cemetery adjacent to the Military cemetery.

Story for the South African Legion of Military Veterans by Lgr Charles Ross with photos by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and Cullinan Heritage Society.

Lancaster W4888

On a remote location in the Netherland’s the South African national flag permanently flutters proudly next to the Canadian, British and Dutch national flags – held high in grateful recognition of the sacrifice to liberate the country during World War 2 and to commemorate a special memorial and site.

Recently the South African Legion representative in Europe, Andrew Bergman, was invited to join the SANDF Attache’ to Belgium, Colonel Maryna Fondse, to remember a very special South African.

This is the re-dedication ceremony of the plaque for the memorial of Lancaster W4888 which was attacked by a German night fighter and crashed on 5 May 1943 on its return from a bombing raid on Dortmund with the loss of six of the seven crew.

The South African connection is the pilot, Nicholas James Stanford (RAF 80378) who was born in South Africa in 1915 and enlisted in 1941 in Salisbury, Rhodesia. After his training he arrived at 101 Squadron and flew several operations.

The re-dedication of the plaque, occurred in Workum (Vriesland) in the Netherlands today under the auspices of Workumer Verzetsmonument on the 16 April 2015.

A beautiful protea wreath was supplied by Colonel Fondse – and was laid in a joint ceremony with Andrew Bergman – it really did South Africa proud and it was an immeasurable honour for us to be able to participate in such a fitting and decorous ceremony.

It is also most heartening to see the way that the town of Workum has ‘embraced’ this sad episode in their history, and continue to honour our fallen airmen “who fought for freedom and justice”.

The clearly deep impression it all made on the men’s relatives – in the knowledge that the ultimate price paid by their ancestor is not forgotten – was pure gold!

This is just some of the fantastic work been by the SANDF Defence attache to Belgium/Brussels EU – and to Colonel Maryna Fondse and her team and our sincere thanks must go. On days like this it makes us all eternally proud to be Legionnaires.

Here’s the link http://warkumserfskip.nl/id372.htm

Story for the South African Legion by Peter Dickens with contributions from Andrew Bergman

Dar Es Salaam Cemetery

The East African campaign of the First World War which started on 05 August 1914 when troops from the Uganda attacked German boast on Lake Victoria. This was soon followed up by an assault on the radio stations by the ships from the Royal Navy on 08 August 1914.Dar es Salaam was the capital of German East Africa, modern day Tanzania, and soon became the focal point for the Commonwealth Forces with the establishment of the General Headquarters there and later the No 3 East Africa Stationary Hospital. It was also the primary port of entry for supplies and the evacuation of the wounded.

At the start of the East African campaign the South African forces were involved in the German South West African, modern day Namibia, which ended on 09 July 1915. By 1916 South African forces were deployed, along with Indian and other Commonwealth forces, in the East African campaign. The war in German East Africa ended 25 November 1918.

DAR ES SALAAM WAR CEMETERY was created in 1968 when the 660 First World War graves at Dar Es Salaam (Ocean Road) Cemetery had to be moved to facilitate the construction of a new road. As the burials in the former African Christian, Non-Christian and Mohammedan plots had not been marked individually, they were reburied in collective graves, each marked by a screen wall memorial. (Memorial Gardens “B”, “C” and “D”). During the early 1970s, a further 1,000 graves were brought into this site from cemeteries all over Tanzania, where maintenance could no longer be assured.

Dar es Salaam War Cemetery now contains 1,764 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 60 of them unidentified. The 112 war graves of other nationalities, the majority of them Belgian and German, all date from the First World War.

A total of 612 identified and 3 unidentified South African casualties from the First World War are commemorated in the cemetery. Of this 280 are South African Infantry, 88 are South African Horse, 73 are South African Service Corps, 54 are Cape Corps, 27 are South African Medical Corps, 16 are Rhodesian Regiment, 15 are South African Field Artillery. 11 are South African Rifles, 7 are South African Native Labour Corps, 6 each are British South Africa Police and South African Veterinary Service, 5 each are South African Engineers and South African Mounted Brigade, 3 each from the South African Motor Cycle Corps and South African Pioneers, 2 each are Northern Rhodesian Police, South African Indian Bearer Corps, South African Mounted Engineers, South African Mounted Rifles and South African Water Supply Corps, 1 each are Northern Rhodesian Regiment, Northern Rhodesian Native Regiment, Camp Commandant, South African Intelligence Corps, South African Road Corps and South African Special Service Company.

The cemetery also contains the DAR ES SALAAM HINDU CREMATION MEMORIAL which commemorates 14 Indian servicemen whose remains were cremated in accordance with their faith.

The DAR ES SALAAM BRITISH AND INDIAN MEMORIAL which stands within Dar es Salaam War Cemetery, commemorates by name more than 1,500 officers and men who died in East Africa during and after January 1917 (the advance to the Rufiji river) who have no known grave. The memorial was moved from a site elsewhere in the township and re-sited in Memorial Garden A. The earlier casualties are commemorated by a similar memorial at Nairobi, Kenya.

During the Second World War, Tanzania saw the creation of several transit camps within its borders for Commonwealth forces moving to and from the Middle East and India. There are 41 graves from the Second World War, 7 of them unidentified. 34 of these are South African of which 16 are casualties from the South African Air Force.

The cemetery is maintained by the East African Office of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Story for the South African Legion of Military Veterans by Charles Ross with photos by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Eric Horace Johnson

It is with sadness again that we announcethatWW2SAAF fighter pilot Eric Johnson passed away earlier this month on 6 April 2015 at the near age of 97. Another one of our finest SouthAfricanWW2 heroes has slipped from this world to touch the face of God.R.I.P. Eric and condolences to his family and friends. We will remember him.Eric Horace Johnson joined the South African Air Force in 1941 and qualified as a fighter pilot. He was sent to the Middle East and did operational service with No. 5 Fighter Squadron in North Africa.

He participated in the Alamein battles of 1942 and the subsequent push where the Germans were eventually defeated in North Africa by mid 1943. Flying Tomahawk and Kittyhawk aircraft, their squadron did various duties including protection/defensive sorties to own troops, bomber escorts, armed recces, ground attack sorties and others.

Eric had an eventful combat tour. At one stage he was shot down, wounded and hospitalised. For the remainder of the war Eric was involved with pilot training in the Middle East, Italy and South Africa.

After the war Eric had a long and successful career as an Industrial Chemist until his retirement in 1984.

Visit his tribute web page.

Thanks to Tinus Le Roux and Eric’s family for the notification and provision of Eric’s photographs and references.